About 100 million units of handsets are sold in Europe ever

year. We must build a presence there.”In the fourth quarter of 2018, Oppo outcompeted Samsung to

become the largest smartphone vendor in Thailand with a market share of 22.2 percent, gro

wing about 70 percent year-on-year, according to the market research company Canalys.

Its products and services are also well received in other South Asian and Sout

heast Asian countries, including India, and African countries such as Kenya.

In 2018, Oppo shipped 113 million units of smartphones wor

ldwide, garnering a global market share of more than 8 percent, according to IDC data.

Other Chinese smartphone makers, including Huawei, Xiaomi and Vivo, are also looking beyon

d their home turf for growth. In this context, Oppo believes it has an edge over others as it first started its i

nternational journey as early as in 2009 in Thailand, much before others jumped on the going-global bandwagon.

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FUZHOU – In the Chinese city of Quanzhou, East China’s

Fujian province, workers at a garment factory of Kelme are busy stitching and ironing the white and blue jerseys of the Spanish football club Espanyol.

Their goal is to meet the soaring domestic demand boosted by Wu

Lei, a Chinese striker who joined the club a month ago. Wu made history by becoming the first Ch

inese player to score in a La Liga match on March 2, sending his fans into a frenzy.

“Over the last month, we have sold over 10,000 Wu Lei jerseys,” said Ke Yongyuan, presid

ent of Kelme (China), who owns the Yuanxiang garment company in the sportswear manufacturing hub.

Prior to Wu’s debut in Europe, Yuanxiang acquired 80 per

cent of Kelme’s shares and became the controlling shareholder of the renowned inter

national brand. Yuanxiang’s expansion offers a glimpse into Chinese manufacturers’ endeavor of going global.

xuexizhongguo.cn

hinese President Xi Jinping sent a message of condolenc

to New Zealand Governor-General Patsy Reddy on Friday over the deadly shooting incidents earlier Friday in New Zealand’s Christchurch City.

In his message, Xi said he was shocked to learn about the serious shooting incidents which have caused heavy casualties.

On behalf of the Chinese government, the Chinese people and in his ow

n name, Xi expressed deep sympathy with and sincere condolences to the New Zealand gov

ernment and the New Zealand people, while expressing grief for the victims and wishing the injured an early recovery.

Also on Friday, Chinese Premier Li Keqiang sent a message of condolence to New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Arder

n, expressing grief for the victims while extending sincere sympathies to the injured and the bereaved families.

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The Olympic giant slalom champion won three giant slalo

  Hirscher’s season tally of 10 wins was reduced to nine after the Court of Arbitration for Sport upheld Stefan Luitz’s ap

peal against a doping violation and reinstated the German’s victory in Beaver Creek on December 2.

  Luitz was disqualified when he was photographed inhaling oxygen from a mouthpiece between the fi

rst and second runs. The International Ski Federation (FIS) ruled it was against anti-doping rules at FIS events. Luitz lodged an app

eal on January 29 and it was heard on March 11. The panel ruled that the World Anti-Doping Code prevails over FIS laws.

  ”FIS fully accepts the decision of CAS and all World Cup records and the World Cup star

ting list for giant slalom has been adjusted to reflect the decision,” said an FIS statement.

  Visit CNN.com/Sport for more news, features and videos

  Pinturault won the giant slalom in Andorra to seal second place on the overall season standings and become the most s

uccessful French ski racer ever with a 23rd World Cup win, eclipsing compatriot Carole Merle, who retired in 1994.

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Indian tech billionaire gives $7.5 billion to charitywealth to

  India’s second-richest man is giving billions to charity in what may be the country’s biggest single donation ever.

  Azim Premji, the billionaire chairman of Wipro (WIT), is handing shares in the

tech company worth nearly 530 billion rupees ($7.5 billion) to his philanthropic foundation.

  The tech tycoon has now donated a total of $21 billion to the Azim Premji Foundat

ion over several years, including 67% of Wipro’s shares, the foundation said in a statement.

  Premji, 73, has a fortune of more than $18 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index.

  He was the first Indian to sign the Giving Pledge, a campaign started by Warren Bu

ffett with Bill and Melinda Gates to encourage billionaires around the world to commit most of their wealth to charity.

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We have to stop this hate and start seeing Muslims as human

  When I woke up Friday morning to the news of the massacre at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, I felt sick. But sad

ly, not entirely surprised. I had been dreading this kind of violence happening, although I would have never imag

ined this kind of scale — 49 Muslim men, women and children killed in cold blood with such clinical, methodical precision and filmed for social media.

  Islamophobia is on the rise and has been for some time. Muslims have been demonize

d, dehumanized and scapegoated on an industrial scale by society since 9/11.

  No other group has been punished for the sins of the father in such a systematic and accepted way. Politicians, commen

tators, influencers and the media on the right have waged a war against Muslims that has become normalized.

  The most powerful man on the planet, President Donald Trump, has sought to ban them fro

m entering the United States. British prime minister hopeful and former Foreign Secretary Bori

s Johnson made “jokes” insulting Muslim women, saying they looked like letter boxes. After those comments, Tell Mam

a, an organization that records Muslim hate incidents, reported that attacks on Muslim women went up.

  They often take the form of pulling off a woman’s headscarf, espe

cially when she’s taking her children to and from school. Imagine what that does to a young

frightened and confused Muslim child? We have respected high-profile commentators who say that Islam

ophobia doesn’t exist and imply that “they” have brought it on themselves because of terrorism.

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Ahmad Khan said he watched as a man was shot dead in his

  A total of 49 people were killed in the mosque attacks on Friday. The massacre has stunned residents, not just because it happen

ed there but also because it was planned to show the world that even the most peaceful places are not immune to terror.

  Australian citizen Brenton Tarrant, 28, has been charged with one count of murder. Two other peo

ple remain in police custody. New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern described it as “one of New Zealand’s darkest days.”

  Khan wasn’t the only member of his family touched by the shootings. A few blocks away

, at the Al Noor mosque, Khan’s uncle is believed to be one of 41 people gunned down there while praying.

  On Saturday, families waited patiently as officials worked to identify bodies. Yet while confirmation will bring some closure, questio

ns will linger as to how such a horrifying event can happen in a country many consider safe.

  ”We felt it was such a safe city, such a safe country,” a 30-year-

old construction project manager, who did not want to be named, told CNN. “The hatred has spread everywhere.”

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Harrison’s 19-year-old son, Zin South, heard reports that a gun

  at the mosque. He remembered his mother was at their property waiting to meet a contractor. He texted her. She was safe.

  Then he saw the video broadcast live from a camera fixed to the gunman’s helmet. It

showed the gunman using the family’s driveway as a base to store his loaded weapons.

  ”I couldn’t believe it, that the guy had literally parked in our driveway and walked into the mosque, walked back to our driveway and back into the mosque,” South said.

  When police arrived they helped Harrison get out of the house and over the back fence. “She wa

sn’t allowed to leave (by the front) because there were literally bodies lying in the driveway,” her son said.

  The family says there’s no way that house can be their home now.

  Amid the flowers at the roadblock on Saturday was a homemade sign printed on a piece of A4 paper, titled “#No to hate and terror.”

  ”If New Zealand is like a vessel of milk filled to the very brim, then consider immigrants

as a pinch of sugar. We’ll not bring the vessel to overflowing but make the milk sweeter,” the sign said.

  The author, Deepak Sharma, was standing nearby holding an identical copy. He moved from India to New Zeal

and 10 years ago, and with tears in his eyes told CNN, “This is not the country we chose to immigrate to.”

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William, Kate, Harry and Meghan condemn “horrifying assault”today.

  William and Kate, The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, and Harry and Meghan, The Duke and Duchess of Sus

sex, have said they have all spent time in Christchurch and its “open-hearted and generous” people.

  They condemned the violence on the Muslim community, calling it “horrifying assault on a way of life that embodies decency, community, and friendship.”

  ”No person should ever have to fear attending a sacred place of worship,” the royal couples said in a statement.

  Here’s the full statement:

  Our hearts go out to the families and friends of the people who lost their lives in the devastating attack in Christchurch.

  We have all been fortunate to spend time in Christchurch and have felt the warm, open-hearted and generous spirit that is core to its remarkable people.

  No person should ever have to fear attending a sacred place of worship.

  This senseless attack is an affront to the people of Christchurch and New Zealand, and the broader Muslim comm

unity. It is a horrifying assault on a way of life that embodies decency, community, and friendship.

  We know that from this devastation and deep mourning, the people of New Zealand will unite to show that such evil can never defeat compassion and tolerance.

  We send our thoughts and prayers to everyone in New Zealand today.

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Showing off sometimes diabolical but compelling politic

  skills, Trump was audacious, provocative and spiteful. He made outrageous boasts about his own success and hin

ted at his acute sense of human nature and feral appreciation of weakness and discomfort in a political opponent.

  Trump also showed his indifference, or rude disregard for the political plights of allied le

aders, indulged his willingness to trade in falsehoods, and betrayed his obsessions with his predecessor President Barack Obama.

  At Thursday’s White House meeting, Trump was also asked by a reporter about the fre

shest entrant in the Democratic White House race — former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke. He was ready.

  ”Well, I think he’s got a lot of hand movement. I’ve never seen so much hand movement. I said is he crazy or is that just the way he acts.”

  ”Study it, I’m sure you’ll agree,” Trump told reporters.

  The jab at O’Rourke was not just a throwaway. It was a return to the forensic

targeting of political opponents that helped Trump dismantle the Republican primary field in 2016.

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